Accidents occur every day and it is not always clear who exactly is at fault. When a plaintiff is partially at fault for an accident in New York the concept of comparative negligence comes into effect. The concept of comparative negligence is that each person’s negligence is weighed when determining the amount of damages that will be awarded to each side after an accident. For example, if you are a plaintiff and found that you were 25{af137f1675bbc2c4e98e51253ec9a172ee49f68dae0b591c10fdf3ad79b04760} negligence in a car accident you would be awarded 75{af137f1675bbc2c4e98e51253ec9a172ee49f68dae0b591c10fdf3ad79b04760} of the damages. New York is a Pure Comparative Fault state meaning that even if you were 99{af137f1675bbc2c4e98e51253ec9a172ee49f68dae0b591c10fdf3ad79b04760} at fault for an accident you still are awarded the one percent of damages.

If you believe you were partially negligent in an accident then you need a personal injury legal team that is experienced in litigating comparative negligence cases in New York. Having a personal injury attorney that can successfully argue that you contributed the least amount of negligence to an accident can be the difference between receiving thousands in damages rather than paying them thousands in damages. Alan Greenberg and his team of personal injury attorneys will offer you free advice on how much of a possible settlement you may be able to receive or defer in a Comparative Fault case and will give you the personal attention you need to get the best possible settlement after an accident.

This post is provided by GREENBERG LAW P.C., experienced trial lawyers you need if you or a loved one has been involved in a car accident, construction accident, slip or trip and fall accident, medical malpractice, or has been injured in any way due to the fault of another. Contact us by email or call us today at 877-972-5656 to receive more information.

Disclaimer: The information provided in this post in not intended to be construed as legal advice, nor should it be considered a substitute for obtaining individual legal counsel.